hotteaandoranges:

mentalalchemy:

 
hoodjab:
A Greek doctor has photographed an extremely rare moment during a birth, showing a baby still encased inside the amniotic sac after it has been removed from the mother’s body.
Because the sac had not been punctured, Dr Tsigris said the baby did not even realise it had been born and behaved as if it was still inside the mother’s womb.
The doctor said there was no risk to the baby as it was still feeding off the placenta and would begin to breathe as soon as the sac was broken.
[Source]

As long as the placenta is still intact and connected, this is true.
It’s actually called being "born in the caul" or "born behind the veil" and it is considered extremely lucky in many parts of the world — at least, it is when it happens naturally, and not as a result of surgical intervention. 
Some cultures believe that this makes your child a “King by right” and that he or she has some “special” powers. Those powers can range from leadership abilities to natural healers or having greater insight.
Famous individuals who were born in the caul are: Albert Einstein, the Emperor of France, Napoleon Bonaparte, and Charlemagne (Charles the Great). 
[Source]
(as an aside, this picture vividly displays why waterbirth is such a lovely transition for a newborn.  Think about it:  going from one warm, soft environment into another and then gradually lifted into the light OR being hustled through a tiny tunnel and immediately into a freezing room with exclaiming voices and blindingly bright lights where your limbs flail about, unaccustomed to their weight.
I’ve had a waterbirth and I can tell you, my daughter — now 14 — was so content and quiet the first ten minutes after being brought up out of the water that my husband was honestly alarmed. He was too accustomed to seeing the shrieking, screaming angry babies in the delivery rooms, so this was quite an awakening for him.)

hotteaandoranges:

mentalalchemy:

 

hoodjab:

A Greek doctor has photographed an extremely rare moment during a birth, showing a baby still encased inside the amniotic sac after it has been removed from the mother’s body.

Because the sac had not been punctured, Dr Tsigris said the baby did not even realise it had been born and behaved as if it was still inside the mother’s womb.

The doctor said there was no risk to the baby as it was still feeding off the placenta and would begin to breathe as soon as the sac was broken.

[Source]

As long as the placenta is still intact and connected, this is true.

It’s actually called being "born in the caul" or "born behind the veil" and it is considered extremely lucky in many parts of the world — at least, it is when it happens naturally, and not as a result of surgical intervention. 

Some cultures believe that this makes your child a “King by right” and that he or she has some “special” powers. Those powers can range from leadership abilities to natural healers or having greater insight.

Famous individuals who were born in the caul are: Albert Einstein, the Emperor of France, Napoleon Bonaparte, and Charlemagne (Charles the Great). 

[Source]

(as an aside, this picture vividly displays why waterbirth is such a lovely transition for a newborn.  Think about it:  going from one warm, soft environment into another and then gradually lifted into the light OR being hustled through a tiny tunnel and immediately into a freezing room with exclaiming voices and blindingly bright lights where your limbs flail about, unaccustomed to their weight.

I’ve had a waterbirth and I can tell you, my daughter — now 14 — was so content and quiet the first ten minutes after being brought up out of the water that my husband was honestly alarmed. He was too accustomed to seeing the shrieking, screaming angry babies in the delivery rooms, so this was quite an awakening for him.)

Reblogged from hotteaandoranges